History
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Originally, the Taipei region was administered as a part of Keelung (雞籠) or Tamsui (淡水). It was not until the first year of the Guangxu reign period (1875 A.D.) that the name “Taipei” came into being, when Shen Baozhen called for the establishment of a Taipeh Prefecture (台北府), with Taipeh meaning northern Taiwan. Taipei County (台北縣) was first established during the Japanese occupation, in an attempt to emulate the administrative system of the Qing Dynasty. It was later renamed Taipei Prefecture (台北廳) as the administrative zones in Taiwan underwent further restructuring. In 1920, the name was changed once more, this time to Taihoku Prefecture (台北州). After the end of the Japanese colonial period, Taihoku Prefecture was renamed Taipei County. The capital of Taihoku Prefecture became Taipei City, and was thereafter considered a separate administrative division. Taipei County’s county seat was relocated to present-day Banqiao City.
  
The 15th Year of the Nan Ming Period
(1661 A.D.)
After Koxinga defeated the Dutch in Taiwan, one prefecture and two counties were established on the island. The present-day New Taipei City area was under the jurisdiction of what was then known as Tian Xing County.
The 23rd Year of the Kangxi Reign Period
(1684 A.D.)
Today’s New Taipei City was placed under the jurisdiction of Zhuluo County, Taiwan Prefecture.
The 1st Year of the Yongzheng Reign Period
(1723 A.D.)
The region north of the Dajia River was placed under the jurisdiction of Tamsui Subprefecture.
The 1st Year of the Guangxu Reign Period
(1875 A.D.)
Shen Baozhen called for the establishment of Taipeh Prefecture.
The 4th Year of the Guangxu Reign Period
(1878 A.D.)
Taipeh Prefecture came into existence, with today’s Hsinchu, Tamsui, and Yilan Counties under its jurisdiction. The capital of Taipeh Prefecture was situated in the area between Mengjia and Dadaocheng. Tamsui Subprefecture was also established.
The 13th Year of the Guangxu Reign Period
(1887 A.D.)
Taiwan Province was established, with three prefectures. Present-day New Taipei City was under the jurisdiction of Taipeh Prefecture.
 
June,
The 21st Year of the Guangxu Reign Period
(The 28th Year of the Meiji Period)
(1895 A.D.)
  
Taipei County was established under Japanese rule. Keelung
Subprefecture, Yilan Subprefecture, and Hsinchu Subprefecture were included within Taipei County’s administrative area. In August, Tamsui Subprefecture was re-established.
The 23rd Year of the Guangxu Reign Period
(The 30th Year of the Meiji Period)
(1897 A.D.)
Hsinchu County and Yilan Prefecture were separated from Taipei County. Subprefectures were abolished. Taipei County had 13 administrative offices, in Taipei, Shihlin, Xinzhuang, Huwei, Jingwei, Taoziyuan, Sanjiaoyong, Shulinkou, Chungli, Keelung, Jinbaoli, Dingshuangxi, and Shuifanjiao.
The 27th Year of the Guangxu Reign Period
(The 34th Year of the Meiji Period)
(1901 A.D.)
 
Counties were replaced by Prefectures and local administrative offices were abolished. Taipei County was divided into five prefectures: Taipei, Keelung, Shenkeng, Taoyuan, and Hsinchu.
The 1st Year of the Xuantong Reign Period
(The 42nd Year of the Meiji Period)
(1909 A.D.)
Local prefectures were restructured. The entirety of Keelung Prefecture and most of Shenkeng Prefecture were integrated into Taipei Prefecture. Thirteen subprefectures were established under Taipei Prefecture.
The 9th Year of the Republic
(The 9th Year of the Taishō Period)
(1920 A.D.)
The reform of the local administrative system saw the Japanese name for prefectures change from “Cho” to “Shu"; both terms are translated as prefecture. Present-day New Taipei City was attached to Taipei Prefecture.
October 25th,
The 34th Year of the Republic
(The 20th Year of the Shōwa period)
(1945 A.D.)
After the retrocession of Taiwan, Taipei City and Keelung City, originally under the jurisdiction of Taipei Prefecture, were upgraded to provincial municipalities. The rest of Taipei Prefecture was designated Taipei County; this included Yilan City and districts of Tamshui, Wenshan, Xinzhuang, Luodong, Keelung, Yilan, Chising, Suao, and Haishan.
December,
The 34th Year of the Republic
(1945 A.D.)
The regulations governing the structure of county governments were announced. Each county government was to be headed by a magistrate aided by a Secretariat’s Office, General Affairs Division, Civil Affairs Department, Finance Division, Education Division, Construction Department, and Police Department to facilitate county administration.
November,
The 37th Year of the Republic
(1948 A.D.)
The provincial government amended the regulations governing the structure of county governments. In addition to the magistrate, a secretary general was assigned. Under these were the Secretariat’s Office, Civil Affairs Department, Finance Division, Education Division, Construction Department, Land Administration Division, Military Service Division, Cooperation Office, Police Department, Accounting Office, and Personnel Office. 
September,
The 38th Year of the Republic
(1949 A.D.)
Shihlin Town and Peitou Town were removed from Tamsui District and placed under the jurisdiction of the Tsaoshan Administrative Bureau, which was later renamed the Yangmingshan Administrative Bureau.
August,
The 39th Year of the Republic
(1950 A.D.)
Taiwan’s administrative areas were restructured. Luodong and Yilan as well as eight townships and three other towns originally under Taipei County’s jurisdiction were restructured as Yilan County. County governments replaced district offices in directing and administering townships and towns.
January,
The 40th Year of the Republic
(1951 A.D.)
 
The Revenue Service Office was established to collect taxes for the national government
July,
The 57th Year of the Republic
(1968 A.D.)
Taipei County’s Jingmei Town, Nangang Town, Muzha Township, Neihu Township and Tsaoshan Administrative Bureau’s Shihlin Town and Peitou Town were integrated into Taipei City’s administrative jurisdiction.
May,
The 71st Year of the Republic
(1982 A.D.)
To make better use of the human resources within each county and city government, the Taiwan Provincial Government amended the regulations and guidelines governing the structure of county and city governments once again. A total of 14 departments, divisions, and offices were established, including a Civil Affairs Department, Finance Department, Construction Department, Education Department, Public Works Department, Agriculture Department, Public Housing Department, Social Welfare Department, Military Service Division, Land Administration Division, Secretariat’s Office, Planning Office, Personnel Office, and Accounting and Statistics Office.
  
The 84th Year of the Republic
(1995 A.D.)
  
More restructuring saw the establishment of a total of 17 departments and offices under each county government, including a Civil Affairs Department, Finance Department, Construction Department, Education Department, Public Works Department, Agriculture Department, Public Housing Department, Social Welfare Department, Labor Affairs Department, Military Service Department, Land Administration Department, Secretariat’s Office, Press Office, Legal Affairs Office, Planning Office, Personnel Office, and Accounting and Statistics Office.
The 88th Year of the Republic
(1999 A.D.)
The self-government ordinances of the Taipei County Government were implemented in accordance with the Local Systems Act. With a population of more than 1.5 million people, Taipei County was entitled to two deputy magistrates. Other adjustments included upgrading the fire brigade under the Police Department into the new Fire Department and the County Cultural Center into the new Department of Cultural Affairs. The Public Housing Department and the urban planning section under the Public Works Department were integrated into the Public Housing and Urban and Rural Development Department to better cater to local needs. Meanwhile, the Transportation Department and Indigenous Affairs Department (later renamed the Indigenous Peoples Department) were also established. The operation of these newly-established level-one departments kicked off on October 12th, 1999. The Indigenous Affairs Department began delivery of services on July 1st, 2000.
October 1st,
The 96th Year of the Republic
(2007 A.D.)
After Taipei County was granted quasi-municipality status, senior management positions were replaced with administrative officers. Taipei County was given the power to make public announcements and issue documents as an independent organization. With greater decision-making power over personnel, the county government went through another organizational restructuring and established a Tourism and Travel Department and a Hakka Affairs Department. The Construction Department, Water Resources and Sewer Department, Public Housing and Urban and Rural Development Department, and Indigenous Affairs Department were subsequently renamed the Economic Development Department, Water Resources Department, Urban and Rural Development Department, and Indigenous Peoples Department, respectively.
December 25th,
The 99th Year of the Republic
(2010 A.D.)
New Taipei City was established. With its status as a municipality, the city government was entitled to one mayor, three deputy mayors, and one secretary general. The city government included 27 level-one organizations, including the Secretariat, Civil Affairs Department, Finance Department, Education Department, Economic Development Department, Public Works Department, Agriculture Department, Urban and Rural Development Department, Social Welfare Department, Land Administration Department, Labor Affairs Department, Transportation Department, Tourism and Travel Department, Legal Affairs Department, Police Department, Health Department, Environmental Protection Department, Fire Department, Cultural Affairs Department, Indigenous Peoples Department, Press Office, Personnel Department, Budget, Accounting, and Statistics Department, Civil Service Ethics Office, Research, Development and Evaluation Commission, and Hakka Affairs Department
January 1st,
The 105th Year of the Republic
(2016 A.D.)
With the approval of the city council, the level-one Rapid Transit System Department was upgraded from its original level-two status to better facilitate future construction of the city’s rapid transit system. 
 Originally, the Taipei region was administered as a part of Keelung (雞籠) or Tamsui (淡水). It was not until the first year of the Guangxu reign period (1875 A.D.) that the name “Taipei” came into being, when Shen Baozhen called for the establishment of a Taipeh Prefecture (台北府), with Taipeh meaning northern Taiwan. Taipei County (台北縣) was first established during the Japanese occupation, in an attempt to emulate the administrative system of the Qing Dynasty. It was later renamed Taipei Prefecture (台北廳) as the administrative zones in Taiwan underwent further restructuring. In 1920, the name was changed once more, this time to Taihoku Prefecture (台北州). After the end of the Japanese colonial period, Taihoku Prefecture was renamed Taipei County. The capital of Taihoku Prefecture became Taipei City, and was thereafter considered a separate administrative division. Taipei County’s county seat was relocated to present-day Banqiao City.
  
The 15th Year of the Nan Ming Period
(1661 A.D.)
After Koxinga defeated the Dutch in Taiwan, one prefecture and two counties were established on the island. The present-day New Taipei City area was under the jurisdiction of what was then known as Tian Xing County.
The 23rd Year of the Kangxi Reign Period
(1684 A.D.)
Today’s New Taipei City was placed under the jurisdiction of Zhuluo County, Taiwan Prefecture.
The 1st Year of the Yongzheng Reign Period
(1723 A.D.)
The region north of the Dajia River was placed under the jurisdiction of Tamsui Subprefecture.
The 1st Year of the Guangxu Reign Period
(1875 A.D.)
Shen Baozhen called for the establishment of Taipeh Prefecture.
The 4th Year of the Guangxu Reign Period
(1878 A.D.)
Taipeh Prefecture came into existence, with today’s Hsinchu, Tamsui, and Yilan Counties under its jurisdiction. The capital of Taipeh Prefecture was situated in the area between Mengjia and Dadaocheng. Tamsui Subprefecture was also established.
The 13th Year of the Guangxu Reign Period
(1887 A.D.)
Taiwan Province was established, with three prefectures. Present-day New Taipei City was under the jurisdiction of Taipeh Prefecture.
 
June,
The 21st Year of the Guangxu Reign Period
(The 28th Year of the Meiji Period)
(1895 A.D.)
 
 
Taipei County was established under Japanese rule. Keelung
Subprefecture, Yilan Subprefecture, and Hsinchu Subprefecture were included within Taipei County’s administrative area. In August, Tamsui Subprefecture was re-established.
The 23rd Year of the Guangxu Reign Period
(The 30th Year of the Meiji Period)
(1897 A.D.)
Hsinchu County and Yilan Prefecture were separated from Taipei County. Subprefectures were abolished. Taipei County had 13 administrative offices, in Taipei, Shihlin, Xinzhuang, Huwei, Jingwei, Taoziyuan, Sanjiaoyong, Shulinkou, Chungli, Keelung, Jinbaoli, Dingshuangxi, and Shuifanjiao.
The 27th Year of the Guangxu Reign Period
(The 34th Year of the Meiji Period)
(1901 A.D.)
 
Counties were replaced by Prefectures and local administrative offices were abolished. Taipei County was divided into five prefectures: Taipei, Keelung, Shenkeng, Taoyuan, and Hsinchu.
The 1st Year of the Xuantong Reign Period
(The 42nd Year of the Meiji Period)
(1909 A.D.)
Local prefectures were restructured. The entirety of Keelung Prefecture and most of Shenkeng Prefecture were integrated into Taipei Prefecture. Thirteen subprefectures were established under Taipei Prefecture.
The 9th Year of the Republic
(The 9th Year of the Taishō Period)
(1920 A.D.)
The reform of the local administrative system saw the Japanese name for prefectures change from “Cho” to “Shu"; both terms are translated as prefecture. Present-day New Taipei City was attached to Taipei Prefecture.
October 25th,
The 34th Year of the Republic
(The 20th Year of the Shōwa period)
(1945 A.D.)
After the retrocession of Taiwan, Taipei City and Keelung City, originally under the jurisdiction of Taipei Prefecture, were upgraded to provincial municipalities. The rest of Taipei Prefecture was designated Taipei County; this included Yilan City and districts of Tamshui, Wenshan, Xinzhuang, Luodong, Keelung, Yilan, Chising, Suao, and Haishan.
December,
The 34th Year of the Republic
(1945 A.D.)
The regulations governing the structure of county governments were announced. Each county government was to be headed by a magistrate aided by a Secretariat’s Office, General Affairs Division, Civil Affairs Department, Finance Division, Education Division, Construction Department, and Police Department to facilitate county administration.
November,
The 37th Year of the Republic
(1948 A.D.)
The provincial government amended the regulations governing the structure of county governments. In addition to the magistrate, a secretary general was assigned. Under these were the Secretariat’s Office, Civil Affairs Department, Finance Division, Education Division, Construction Department, Land Administration Division, Military Service Division, Cooperation Office, Police Department, Accounting Office, and Personnel Office. 
September,
The 38th Year of the Republic
(1949 A.D.)
Shihlin Town and Peitou Town were removed from Tamsui District and placed under the jurisdiction of the Tsaoshan Administrative Bureau, which was later renamed the Yangmingshan Administrative Bureau.
August,
The 39th Year of the Republic
(1950 A.D.)
Taiwan’s administrative areas were restructured. Luodong and Yilan as well as eight townships and three other towns originally under Taipei County’s jurisdiction were restructured as Yilan County. County governments replaced district offices in directing and administering townships and towns.
January,
The 40th Year of the Republic
(1951 A.D.)
 
The Revenue Service Office was established to collect taxes for the national government
July,
The 57th Year of the Republic
(1968 A.D.)
Taipei County’s Jingmei Town, Nangang Town, Muzha Township, Neihu Township and Tsaoshan Administrative Bureau’s Shihlin Town and Peitou Town were integrated into Taipei City’s administrative jurisdiction.
May,
The 71st Year of the Republic
(1982 A.D.)
To make better use of the human resources within each county and city government, the Taiwan Provincial Government amended the regulations and guidelines governing the structure of county and city governments once again. A total of 14 departments, divisions, and offices were established, including a Civil Affairs Department, Finance Department, Construction Department, Education Department, Public Works Department, Agriculture Department, Public Housing Department, Social Welfare Department, Military Service Division, Land Administration Division, Secretariat’s Office, Planning Office, Personnel Office, and Accounting and Statistics Office.
 
 
 
The 84th Year of the Republic
(1995 A.D.)
 
 
More restructuring saw the establishment of a total of 17 departments and offices under each county government, including a Civil Affairs Department, Finance Department, Construction Department, Education Department, Public Works Department, Agriculture Department, Public Housing Department, Social Welfare Department, Labor Affairs Department, Military Service Department, Land Administration Department, Secretariat’s Office, Press Office, Legal Affairs Office, Planning Office, Personnel Office, and Accounting and Statistics Office.
The 88th Year of the Republic
(1999 A.D.)
The self-government ordinances of the Taipei County Government were implemented in accordance with the Local Systems Act. With a population of more than 1.5 million people, Taipei County was entitled to two deputy magistrates. Other adjustments included upgrading the fire brigade under the Police Department into the new Fire Department and the County Cultural Center into the new Department of Cultural Affairs. The Public Housing Department and the urban planning section under the Public Works Department were integrated into the Public Housing and Urban and Rural Development Department to better cater to local needs. Meanwhile, the Transportation Department and Indigenous Affairs Department (later renamed the Indigenous Peoples Department) were also established. The operation of these newly-established level-one departments kicked off on October 12th, 1999. The Indigenous Affairs Department began delivery of services on July 1st, 2000.
October 1st,
The 96th Year of the Republic
(2007 A.D.)
After Taipei County was granted quasi-municipality status, senior management positions were replaced with administrative officers. Taipei County was given the power to make public announcements and issue documents as an independent organization. With greater decision-making power over personnel, the county government went through another organizational restructuring and established a Tourism and Travel Department and a Hakka Affairs Department. The Construction Department, Water Resources and Sewer Department, Public Housing and Urban and Rural Development Department, and Indigenous Affairs Department were subsequently renamed the Economic Development Department, Water Resources Department, Urban and Rural Development Department, and Indigenous Peoples Department, respectively.
December 25th,
The 99th Year of the Republic
(2010 A.D.)
New Taipei City was established. With its status as a municipality, the city government was entitled to one mayor, three deputy mayors, and one secretary general. The city government included 27 level-one organizations, including the Secretariat, Civil Affairs Department, Finance Department, Education Department, Economic Development Department, Public Works Department, Agriculture Department, Urban and Rural Development Department, Social Welfare Department, Land Administration Department, Labor Affairs Department, Transportation Department, Tourism and Travel Department, Legal Affairs Department, Police Department, Health Department, Environmental Protection Department, Fire Department, Cultural Affairs Department, Indigenous Peoples Department, Press Office, Personnel Department, Budget, Accounting, and Statistics Department, Civil Service Ethics Office, Research, Development and Evaluation Commission, and Hakka Affairs Department
January 1st,
The 105th Year of the Republic
(2016 A.D.)
With the approval of the city council, the level-one Rapid Transit System Department was upgraded from its original level-two status to better facilitate future construction of the city’s rapid transit system.